They Played For Brentford And Fulham – Part One 10/12/15

The sense of anticipation and sheer excitement is mounting as we start to count down the days, hours and even minutes until Saturday’s massive clash at Craven Cottage where local bragging rights are once again up for grabs.

It is notoriously hard, if not impossible, to predict the outcome of local derbies as form so often seems to go out of the window and matches can be decided on one incident, a referee’s whim or a lucky bounce so I shan’t even try to do so at this juncture.

Instead I shall try my hardest to alleviate some of the tension that we are all surely beginning to feel by reminiscing about some of the footballers who have played for both the Bees and Fulham over the years.

Starting way back in the mists of time with a remarkable man in Tom Wilson who was hardly an archetypical footballer as he was also a qualified surveyor who played with distinction for both clubs throughput the 50s as a sturdy and reliable right back.

After retirement he returned to Fulham as a director of the club where he worked closely with his former team mate Jimmy Hill to negotiate the purchase of Craven Cottage from the Bank of England which saved the club from being merged with Queens Park Rangers and Craven Cottage from being sold for development.

John Richardson is a name that should have become well known throughout the football world as he seemed certain to become a star but it somehow didn’t happen for him and his career never reached the heights that at one time seemed likely. He followed his Uncle, Billy Gray, from Millwall to Brentford as a seventeen year-old and soon broke into the first team at a time when the Bees were concentrating on youth as they could not afford to pay older and more expensive players. Some, like Eddie Reeve, Phil Basey and Mike Ogburn soon fell by the wayside but Richardson was an exciting prospect who, despite his youth, dominated games from his berth at inside left until he broke his ankle in three places soon after scoring at Port Vale. He recovered but was never really the same and was moved to a more defensive role and the crowd were not the most patient with him either. He was sold to Fulham when still only twenty but his career fizzled out at Aldershot after a spell playing in America.

I have written many times about the late, great, Allan Mansley and I mourn him still as watching him sprint down the left wing leaving a trail of beaten opponents in his wake was one of the wonders and delights of my youth. Injury cruelly halted his career in its tracks when greatness beckoned and he had a brief and unsuccessful loan spell at Craven Cottage, playing once in a heavy defeat at Swansea before his career ended so sadly and prematurely.

Roger Cross is another who is pretty high up on my list of boyhood heroes. He of the flowing locks, white boots, long throw and howitzer left foot shot. He oozed elegance and class after his move from West Ham United and it was no surprise when after scoring fourteen times in his first full season he moved on to Fulham for a thirty thousand pound fee when the directors kept their word to allow him to return to a higher level if the opportunity ever arose.

He looked a different and lesser player in the Second Division, more cumbersome and less prone to take a match by the scruff of its neck and he soon returned to his natural home where he sparkled for another four years before making a surprise move to Millwall which never worked out for him. He is still involved with the game as a scout at Charlton and has enjoyed a long and illustrious career.

Barry Salvage forged an excellent career for himself as a quick winger with an eye for goal. He never left London and played for five local clubs, starting with a brief spell at Fulham before moving to Millwall and Queens Park Rangers. He enjoyed a productive stay at Brentford, often cutting in for a shot and I remember his winning goal after a mere twenty-four seconds against Charlton. He had a second spell at The Den and then moved to play in America and Norway before tragically dying very young.

Dave Metchick was a small and skilful ball playing midfielder whose career never quite took off. He started off at Fulham but failed to establish himself in the First Division and drifted from club to club before making a surprise move to Arsenal where he never played in the first team. He joined the Bees in 1973 on his return from playing in the North American Soccer League and made an immediate impact, pulling the strings in midfield and using the ball neatly and effectively. A really good player for us who shone in a mediocre team.

John Fraser joined the Bees after a decent spell at Fulham which included him playing in the 1975 FA Cup Final out of position at left back when Les Strong, also to play for Brentford later in his career, was forced to pull out through injury. He transformed himself from a fullback into an excellent ball winning midfielder who was a mainstay of the team until, like several others, he apparently fell out with a former Fulham colleague in Brentford manager, Fred Callaghan and ended up as a taxi driver.

Dave Carlton was a bargain signing by Bill Dodgin – another ex-Fulham stalwart – who gave us excellent service for four years. He had a wonderful eye for a pass and often switched the point of attack. He created many goals but could sometimes lose his head on the pitch and incur the wrath of referees.Fulham left him go as a youngster but Carlton established himself at Northampton Town before a mere three thousand pound transfer fee brought him to Griffin Park.

Steve Scrivens is another footballer who bemuses me to this day. A lithe and quick left winger who played a few games for Fulham as a teenager, he joined Brentford on loan in December 1976 and impressed everyone with his ability. Despite all our efforts, Fulham would not allow us to sign him on permanent basis and he returned to Craven Cottage – and never played for them, or any other Football League club again. Can anybody please explain why as it appeared to be a total waste of an exceptionally talented young player?

Paul Shrubb is quite simply one of the bravest men it has been my honour and privilege to meet. Rejected by Fulham after one measly appearance, he made a name for himself in South Africa before joining Brentford where he sparkled for five seasons and played nearly two hundred games for us in a variety of positions. He was consistent, honest, versatile and skilful whether he played as a central defender, midfielder, striker or even as an emergency goalkeeper. He gave everything to the team and was a wonderful clubman. He then gave equally good service to Aldershot where he also became a local hero and to this day he continues to be an inspiration to everyone as he fights Motor Neurone Disease. Shrubby, every Brentford supporter salutes you.

Barry Lloyd is one of the rare players who had spells at all three West London clubs as he started at Chelsea before making over two hundred and fifty appearances for Fulham and was on the bench for the 1975 FA Cup Final. He also captained the club and is best remembered for a superlative volleyed FA Cup goal against Leicester City’s Peter Shilton which wowed the Match of the Day viewers. For some reason he never captured the hearts and minds of Brentford fans and was subjected to some unpleasant barracking. He did decent enough job in midfield and contributed to our promotion push but his stay was short and he moved to America before a long and successful career as a manager and scout.

Most goalkeepers count the number of clean sheets but for Trevor Porter it was clean windows. He was Peter Mellor’s understudy at Fulham and did a good unassuming and unspectacular job when he signed for Brentford after Len Bond’s injuries sustained in a car crash. He remained at the club for a couple of seasons combining the role of reserve goalkeeper with his window cleaning.

Terry Hurlock is best remembered for his swashbuckling and rumbunctious performances for Brentford. A terrifying and unforgettable sight with his long flowing hair, beard and gold earring twinkling in the sunshine, he combined aggressive tackles with an unexpected range of more subtle skills and enjoyed a long and illustrious career which was finished off with a short spell at Craven Cottage where at the age of thirty-seven he retired after he suffered a broken leg after a tackle by Martin Grainger, ironically enough in a friendly match against the Bees.

Francis Joseph is another near-legend at Brentford who played a few games for Fulham in his swan song. He promised so much but never fully recovered from a badly broken leg, lost his greatest asset in his pace and was never the same player again. A terrible waste of an exceptional talent.

His partner during his golden spell at Griffin Park was Tony Mahoney. He was discarded by Fulham like an unwanted old sock after his early promise evaporated but he was revitalised after Fred Callaghan signed him for the Bees. He proved to be an exceptional target man who scored fifteen goals in only twenty-eight games before tragedy struck and he suffered a broken leg on an icy pitch against Swindon Town. And that was pretty much that for him as he never fully recovered form or fitness.

Left back, Les Strong was a Fulham stalwart for many years and is best remembered for missing the 1975 FA Cup Final through injury. He had a brief loan spell at Brentford near the end of his career but retired soon afterwards.

Terry Bullivant was another Barry Lloyd in that he did well at Craven Cottage as a midfield player who earned a big money move to Aston Villa but he never really impressed at Griffin Park where his over-aggressive style and inconsistent form ensured that his stay was short. He later returned to Griffin Park more successfully as part of Ron Noades’s coaching team and later became Assistant Manager to Andy Scott.

Tony Parks also had a loan spell at Fulham after he lost his place in goal at Brentford to Graham Benstead and he eventually joined Fulham on a permanent basis but he only played twice for them.

Striker Tony Sealey had two loan spells at Fulham before joining them on a permanent basis and was a regular goalscorer. Small, nippy and sharp, he made his debut for Brentford at Anfield in the FA Cup before scoring memorably after just thirteen seconds against Bristol City.

Striker Kelly Haag scored prolifically in the reserves and youth team but he found the step up to first team football a bit too steep and never managed a league goal for the Bees but scored a few times for both Fulham and Barnet.

Tony Finnigan was another player who never really settled down anywhere after leaving Crystal Palace and had brief spells at both Brentford and Fulham without much effect.

Gerry Peyton was a Fulham goalkeeping legend who played nearly four hundred games for the club. Despite being thirty-six years of age he was wonderfully calm and consistent when he had two spells at Griffin Park in our ill-fated relegation season of 1992/93.

Gus Hurdle never managed a first team appearance at Fulham but he was rescued from a career on the buses when he walked in unannounced to the Brentford training ground and had a decent career as an attacking fullback.

Glen Cockerill joined the Bees from Fulham as Micky Adams’s assistant manager but he played an important role on the field as a solid defensive midfield player despite being nearly forty years of age. He had enjoyed an illustrious career but still had something left in the tank.

As you can see there are so many links between the two clubs and I will finish my list of players who enjoyed spells at both clubs tomorrow.

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2 thoughts on “They Played For Brentford And Fulham – Part One 10/12/15

  1. hi greville oh yes allan mansly what a great player Man U had BFC had Mansly and for us bees fans he was just as good i was at the match against Chesterfield when he was victim of a terriable tackle which in the end finished his career.In your list there i three players i had played with Roger Cross Dave Metchick and Barry Salvage and yes as a young boy watching RC playing in those white boots ! well today everyone would wonder why it was such a big thing but back then it was so diffrent .I remember under DAN TANA the chairman the first big decison he made was to send all us players to have our haircuts to a top london hairdresses and it made the papers one i was featured with Andy Woon having our haircut and to this day thou i must say with a littleles hair on my head lol i still got the same hair style

    Like

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